Low Level Laser Therapy LLLT / Cold Laser Literature watch for May 2012

31 LLLT papers for you from May 2012 including: LLLT after root planing, post episiotomy, and for TMJD, shoulder tendinopathies, dysmenorrhoea, pressure sores and acne vulgaris and much more.

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Short-term clinical and osteoimmunological effects of scaling and root planing complemented by simple or repeated laser phototherapy in chronic periodontitis.

Calderin S, Garcia-Nunez JA, Gomez C

Departamento de Estomatologia III, Facultad de Odontologia, UCM, Madrid, Spain.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, anti-inflammatory, and osteoimmunological benefits of the single (PT) and repeated laser phototherapy (rPT) as an adjunctive treatment of inflamed periodontal tissue. Twenty-seven patients with chronic periodontitis were randomly divided into three groups of nine patients each in order to undergo scaling and root planing (SRP), SRP followed by one session of adjunctive PT (Day 1; SRP + PT), or SRP followed by adjunctive repeated PT five times in 2 weeks (Days 1, 2, 4, 7, and 11; SRP + rPT). For phototherapy session, a diode laser (lambda = 670 nm, 200 mW, 60 s/tooth) was applied into the sulcus. Clinical parameters, including full-mouth plaque score, full-mouth bleeding score, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded. Samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were taken at baseline, 4, and 8 weeks after treatment. Interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaBeta ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in the collected GCF were measured. PT used in a single or repeated doses, does not produce a significant reduction in the clinical parameters essayed (p > 0.05). Levels of IL-1beta in GCF were significantly reduced in SRP + PT and SRP + rPT groups compared with the SRP group (p < 0.05). However, the SRP + rPT group showed a significant reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and RANKL/OPG ratio at 4 weeks post-treatment compared with the SRP + PT and SRP groups (p < 0.05). SRP + PT group also showed a significant reduction in TNF-alpha and RANKL/OPG ratio at 8 weeks post-treatment compared with the SRP group (p < 0.05). PT exerts a biostimulative effect on the periodontal tissue. Multiple sessions of PT showed a faster and greater tendency to reduce proinflammatory mediators and RANKL/OPG ratio.

Lasers Med Sci 2012 May 1

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22546942

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Effectiveness of Physiotherapy and GaAlAs Laser in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

Dostalova T, Hlinakova P, Kasparova M, Rehacek A, Vavrickova L, Navratil L

1 Department of Paediatric Stomatology, 2nd Medical Faculty, Charles University , Prague, Czech Republic .

Abstract Objective: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a treatment method commonly used in physiotherapy for musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to monitor the function of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues and compare the objective measurements of the effect of LLLT. Background data: LLLT has been considered effective in reducing pain and muscular tension; thus improving the quality of patients’ lives. Materials and Methods: TMJ function was evaluated by cephalometric tracing analysis, orthopantomogram, TMJ tomogram, and computer face-bow record. Interalveolar space between central incisors before and after therapy was measured. Patients evaluated pain on the Visual Analog Scale. LLLT was performed in five treatment sessions (energy density of 15.4 J/cm(2)) by semiconductive GaAlAs laser with an output of 280 mW, emitting radiation wavelength of 830 mm. The laser supplied a spot of approximately 0.2 cm(2). Results: Baseline comparisons between the healthy patients and patients with low-level laser application show that TMJ pain during function is based on anatomical and function changes in TMJ areas. Significant differences were seen in the posterior and anterior face height. The results comparing healthy and impaired TMJ sagittal condyle paths showed that patients with TMJ pain during function had significantly flatter nonanatomical movement during function. After therapy, the unpleasant feeling was reduced from 27.5 to 4.16 on the pain Visual Analog Scale. The pain had reduced the ability to open the mouth from 34 to 42 mm. Conclusions: The laser therapy was effective in the improvement of the range of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and promoted a significant reduction of pain symptoms.

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 May 30(5) 275-80

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22551049

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Low-level laser therapy for pain relief after episiotomy: a double-blind randomised clinical trial.

Santos JD, de Oliveira SM, da Silva FM, Nobre MR, Osava RH, Riesco ML

Authors: Jaqueline de O Santos, PhD, CNM, Assistant Lecturer, Instituto de Ciencias da Saude da Universidade Paulista; Sonia MJV de Oliveira, PhD, CNM, Assistant Professor and Flora MB da Silva, CNM, MSN, Doctoral Candidate – CNPq Scholarship, School of Nursing, University of Sao Paulo; Moacyr RC Nobre, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Medical School Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Heart Institute (InCor), University of Sao Paulo; Ruth H Osava, PhD, CNM, Assistant Lecturer, School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, EACH, University of Sao Paulo; Maria LG Riesco, PhD, CNM, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Aims and objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of a low-level laser therapy for pain relief in the perineum following episiotomy during childbirth. Background. Laser irradiation is a painless and non-invasive therapy for perineal pain treatment and its effects have been investigated in several studies, with no clear conclusion on its effectiveness. Design. A double-blind randomised controlled clinical trial. Method. One hundred and fourteen women who underwent right mediolateral episiotomies during vaginal birth in an in-hospital birthing centre in Sao Paulo, Brazil and reported pain >/=3 on a numeric scale (0-10) were randomised into three groups of 38 women each: two experimental groups (treated with red and infrared laser) and a control group. The experimental groups were treated with laser applied at three points directly on the episiotomy after suturing in a single session between 6-56 hours postpartum. We used a diode laser with wavelengths of 660 nm (red laser) and 780 nm (infrared laser). The control group participants underwent all laser procedures, excluding the emission of irradiation. The participants and the pain scores evaluator were blinded to the type of intervention. The perineal pain scores were assessed at three time points: before, immediately after and 30 minutes after low-level laser therapy. Results. The comparison of perineal pain between the three groups showed no significant differences in the three evaluations (p = 0.445), indicating that the results obtained in the groups treated with low-level laser therapy were equivalent to the control group. Conclusions. Low-level laser therapy did not decrease the intensity of perineal pain reported by women who underwent right mediolateral episiotomy. Relevance to clinical practice. The effect of laser in perineal pain relief was not demonstrated in this study. The dosage may not have been sufficient to provide relief from perineal pain after episiotomy during a vaginal birth.

J Clin Nurs 2012 May 30

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22642607

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Skin adhesive low-level light therapy for dysmenorrhoea: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial.

Shin YI, Kim NG, Park KJ, Kim DW, Hong GY, Shin BC

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea.

PURPOSE: The cause of dysmenorrhoea is an abnormal function of smooth muscles in the uterus due to long-term deficient blood supply into smooth muscle tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of skin adhesive low-level light therapy (LLLT) in participants with dysmenorrhoea. METHODS: Thirty-one women were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial. Twenty-one women were treated with active LLLT and ten women were treated with placebo one. The therapy was performed in a laboratory room for 20 min a day over a period of 5 days prior to the expected onset of menstruation. The outcome was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) for each participant’s dysmenorrhoeal pain severity. VAS of each subject was measured every month for 6 months. RESULTS: In the active LLLT group, 16 women reported successful results during their first menstrual cycle just after active LLLT and 5 women had successful results from the second menstrual cycle after active LLLT. The pain reduction rate was 83 % in the active LLLT group, whereas there was only a slight and temporary reduction in pain in the placebo LLLT group. Changes of VAS within 6 months of LLLT showed statistical significance (p = 0.001) over placebo control. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that skin adhesive LLLT on acupuncture points might be an effective, simple and safe non-pharmacological treatment for dysmenorrhoea.

Arch Gynecol Obstet 2012 May 31

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22648444

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Interferential light therapy in the treatment of shoulder tendinopathies: a randomized controlled pilot study.

Montes-Molina R, Martinez-Rodriguez ME, Rodriguez AB, Martinez-Ruiz F, Prieto-Baquero A

Unit of Physiotherapy and Clinical Electrotherapy, Hospital University Ramon y Cajal, IRICYS, Madrid, Spain.

Objectives: To test the safety of the diode light therapy and evaluate the advantages of the interferential effect of two light probes versus a conventional light probe in the relief of shoulder pain and disability caused by shoulder tendinopathies.Design: Randomized single-blind pilot study.Setting: Clinical electrotherapy unit.Participants: A total of 30 patients with shoulder pain from tendinopathies.Interventions: The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group 1 (n = 15) received interferential light therapy generated by two independent and identical cluster probes composed of light emitting and superluminescent diodes. Similarly, two applicators were applied in group 2 (n = 15), but only one was active, as in conventional clinical therapy. Each multi-diode cluster probe was composed of seven light-emitting diodes at 600 nm and 12 superluminescent diodes at 950 nm.Main outcome measures: Pain was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) at day, at night and during several shoulder movements. Shoulder functional status was measured by means of the University California Los Angeles scale (UCLA).Results: Comparison between both treatments using the Mann-Whitney U-test showed better results for the interferential treatment. There were significant differences in pain reduction during abduction (P < 0.05) and external rotation (P < 0.05), with pain reductions in abduction and external rotation of 1.5 (+/- 1.3) and 0.5 (+/- 1.0) respectively.Conclusion: Interferential light therapy was safe and effective regarding the shoulder pain reduction during abduction and external rotation movements. The estimated size sample needed for future two-treatment parallel-design studies will require about 60 patients.

Clin Rehabil 2012 May 29

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22643725

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A Comparative Study on Effectiveness of Ultrasound Therapy and Low Level Laser Therapy in the Management of Second Stage Pressure Sores

Muragod Anil Rachappa 1, P Sreekumaran 2, U Danesh K2,

1KLEU Institute of Physiotherapy Belgaum, Mangalore India 2Nitte Institute of Physiotherapy, Mangalore India

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Ultrasound and Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) on second stage pressure sores so as to be able to deliver better therapy for pressure sore patients on wound healing. Methods Forty subjects were taken for the study along with the routine medical management. 20 subjects receive the pulsed ultrasound therapy three times a week for four weeks with frequency of 3 MHz, and intensity of 0.5W/cm2 to 0.8 W/cm2, for five min with direct technique using hydrogel sheet. Another 20 subjects received the LLLT. The laser emission device used was Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) (904 nm) laser. It was made of a semiconductor infrared radiation source. The non contact method of application was used with 0.5 to 4.0 J/cm2 for 2 min for three times a week for 4 weeks. The wounds were traced before starting the treatment and after 4 weeks of treatment, on transparent paper and wound area was calculated with digitizer (AutoCAD software). Results The results showed a significant (p = 0.001) decrease in pressure sore surface area in both ultrasound and laser group. When both the groups were compared, the laser therapy is found to be more beneficial than the ultrasound therapy (p=0.046). Conclusion Both ultrasound and laser can be used in the management of pressure sores. However in the present study it is seen that LLLT is more beneficial than the ultrasound therapy in the management of pressure sores.

2012 Indian Journal of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy – An International Journal V6, Iss1 11 – 13

http://www.indianjournals.com/ijor.aspx?target=ijor:ijpot&volume=6&issue=1&article=004

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Comparison of Red and Infrared Low-level Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

Aziz-Jalali MH, Tabaie SM, Djavid GE

Department of Dermatology, Hazrat-e Rasool University Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Acne vulgaris is a very prevalent skin disorder and remains a main problem in practice. Recently, phototherapy with various light spectrums for acne has been used. There are some evidences that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has beneficial effect in the treatment of acne lesions. In this study, two different wavelengths of LLLT (630 and 890 nm) were evaluated in treatment of acne vulgaris. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a single-blind randomized clinical trial. Patients with mild to moderate acne vulgaris and age above 18 years and included were treated with red LLLT (630 nm) and infrared LLLT (890 nm) on the right and left sides of the face respectively, twice in a week for 12 sessions, and clinically assessed at baseline and weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were participated in this study. Ten weeks after treatment acne lesion were significantly decreased in the side treated by 630 nm LLLT (27.7+/-12.7 to 6.3+/-1.9) (P0.05). CONCLUSION: Red wavelength is safe and effective to be used to treat acne vulgaris by LLLT compared to infrared wavelength.

Indian J Dermatol 2012 Mar 57(2) 128-30

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22615511

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Body contouring: the skinny on noninvasive fat removal.

Jalian HR, Avram MM

Laser and Cosmetic Center and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA; Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

Historically, the approach to body contouring has largely involved invasive procedures, such as liposuction. Recently, several new devices for noninvasive fat removal have received clearance by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of focal adiposity. Modalities are aimed primarily at targeting the physical properties of fat that differentiate it from the overlying epidermis and dermis, thus selectively resulting in removal. This review will focus on 3 novel approaches to noninvasive selective destruction of fat.

Semin Cutan Med Surg 2012 Jun 31(2) 121-5

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22640432

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Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, laser therapy and LED therapy on the masticatory system and the impact on sleep variables in cerebral palsy patients: a randomized, five arms clinical trial.

Giannasi LC Dr, Matsui MT Dr, Batista SR Prof, Hardt CT Prof, Gomes CP Prof, Amorim JB Dr, Aguiar IC Prof, Collange L Prof, Oliveira EF Prof, Santos IR Prof, Dias IS Prof, Nassif SR Prof, Oliveira CS Dr, Oliveira LV Dr, Gomes MF Dr

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Few studies demonstrate effectiveness of therapies for oral rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy (CP), given the difficulties in chewing, swallowing and speech, besides the intellectual, sensory and social limitations. Due to upper airway obstruction, they are also vulnerable to sleep disorders. This study aims to assess the sleep variables, through polysomnography, and masticatory dynamics, using electromiography, before and after neuromuscular electrical stimulation, associated or not with low power laser (Gallium Arsenide- Aluminun, = 780nm) and LED ( = 660 nm) irradiation in CP patients. Methods/Design: 50 patients with CP, both gender, aged between 19 and 60 years will be enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria are: voluntary participation, patient with hemiparesis, quadriparesis or diparetic CP, with ability to understand and respond to verbal commands. The exclusion criteria are: patients undergoing / underwent orthodontic, functional maxillary orthopedic or botulinum toxin treatment. Polysomnographic and surface electromyographic exams on masseter, temporalis and suprahyoid will be carry out in all sample. Questionnaire assessing oral characteristics will be applied. The sample will be divided into 5 treatment groups: Group 1: neuromuscular electrical stimulation; Group 2: laser therapy; Group 3: LED therapy; Group 4: neuromuscular electrical stimulation and laser therapy and Group 5: neuromuscular electrical stimulation and LED therapy. All patients will be treated during 8 consecutive weeks. After treatment, polysomnographic and electromiographic exams will be collected again. Discussion: This paper describes a five arm clinical trial assessing the examination of sleep quality and masticatory function in patients with CP under non-invasive therapies.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2012 May 15 13(1) 71

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22587485

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Complementary and alternative medicine in osteoarthritis.

De Luigi AJ

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Hospital, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC(dagger).

The intent of this focused clinical review is to assess the current literature on a variety of complementary and alternative medicine treatments for osteoarthritis. This review assesses acupuncture techniques, moxibustion, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, low-level laser therapy, and massage. These treatment methods are growing in popularity among the general public. It is important that providers become aware of the existing literature regarding the efficacy of these alternative methods for the treatment of osteoarthritis to adequately respond to the inquiries of our patients.

PM R 2012 May 4(5 Suppl) S122-33

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22632691

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Methyl aminolevulinate plus red light vs. placebo plus red light in the treatment of photodamaged facial skin: histopathological findings.

Sanclemente G, Correa LA, Garcia JJ, Barrera M, Villa JF, Garcia HI

Group of Investigative Dermatology (GRID) IPS Universitaria Academic Group of Clinical Epidemiology (GRAEPIC), University of Antioquia Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia.

Background. Improvement in the morphological appearance of collagen and elastic fibres has been reported after the use of trichloroacetic acid, dermabrasion and laser therapy, but the histopathological changes occurring after photodynamic therapy are less understood. Aim. To assess the histological changes that occur after methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) plus red-light therapy for facial photodamage. Methods. This was a prospective, double-blind, double-arm, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of MAL plus red light in patients with facial photodamage. A 3-mm punch biopsy was taken from each side of the face before randomization and start of therapy. A dermatopathologist blinded to the treatment assessed epidermal and dermal layer thickness, perivascular inflammation, solar elastosis, perifollicular fibrosis, telangiectasias, number of elastic and collagen fibres, and grade of reticular degeneration. Results. In total, 65 women were initially screened for eligibility, but skin samples from only 38 of these were analysed. The change in dermal thickness from baseline to postintervention was significant (P < 0.01, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Although there was a trend for the epidermis to be thinner after MAL plus red light vs. placebo plus red light (46.25 mum vs. 55.50 mum, respectively), the difference was not significant (P = 0.64, Mann-Whitney U-test). Similarly, the changes in dermal thickness obtained with the two treatments were not significant (P = 0.99, Mann-Whitney test). Histological improvement was seen using stains for collagen, elastic tissue, and perifollicular fibrosis after MAL plus red light therapy. Discussion. Dermal thickness increased after the use of MAL plus red light, and there was improvement in collagen, elastic tissue and perifollicular fibrosis. Although these differences were not significant, most of the histopathological features examined in our study improved after treatment with MAL plus red light. The lack of significance might be due either to the low power of this study or to the failure of our scoring method to detect significant histopathological differences.

Clin Exp Dermatol 2012 Jun 37(4) 379-86

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22582911

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Photoactivation of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells with diode laser: Effects and mechanisms of action.

Giannelli M, Chellini F, Sassoli C, Francini F, Pini A, Squecco R, Nosi D, Bani D, Zecchi-Orlandini S, Formigli L

Odontostomatologic Laser Therapy Center, Via dell’Olivuzzo 162, Florence, Italy.

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising cell candidate in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their proliferative potential can be increased by low-level laser irradiation (LLLI), but the mechanisms involved remain to be clarified. With the aim of expanding the therapeutic application of LLLI to MSC therapy, in the present study we investigated the effects of 635 nm diode laser on mouse MSC proliferation and investigated the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, focusing the attention on the effects of laser irradiation on Notch-1 signal activation and membrane ion channel modulation. It was found that MSC proliferation was significantly enhanced after laser irradiation, as judged by time lapse videomicroscopy and EdU incorporation. This phenomenon was associated with the up-regulation and activation of Notch-1 pathway, and with increased membrane conductance through voltage-gated K(+) , BK and Kir, channels and T-and L-type Ca(2+) channels. We also showed that MSC proliferation was mainly dependent on Kir channel activity, on the basis that the cell growth and Notch-1 up-regulation were severely decreased by the pre-treatment with the channel inhibitor Ba(2+) (0.5mM). Interestingly, the channel inhibition was also able to attenuate the stimulatory effects of diode laser on MSCs, thus providing novel evidence to expand our knowledge on the mechanisms of biostimulation after LLLI. In conclusions, our findings suggest that diode laser may be a valid approach for the preconditioning of MSCs in vitro prior cell transplantation. J. Cell. Physiol. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

J Cell Physiol 2012 May 24

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22628164

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Suppressive effect of low-level laser therapy on tracheal hyperresponsiveness and lung inflammation in rat subjected to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion.

de Lima FM, Vitoretti L, Coelho F, Albertini R, Breithaupt-Faloppa AC, de Lima WT, Aimbire F

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Universidade Nove de Julho, UNINOVE, Rua Vergueiro, 235, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (i-I/R) is an insult associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It is not known if pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in ARDS induced by i-I/R can be controlled by low-level laser therapy (LLLT). This study was designed to evaluate the effect of LLLT on tracheal cholinergic reactivity dysfunction and the release of inflammatory mediators from the lung after i-I/R. Anesthetized rats were subjected to superior mesenteric artery occlusion (45 min) and killed after clamp release and preestablished periods of intestinal reperfusion (30 min, 2 or 4 h). The LLLT (660 nm, 7.5 J/cm(2)) was carried out by irradiating the rats on the skin over the right upper bronchus for 15 and 30 min after initiating reperfusion and then euthanizing them 30 min, 2, or 4 h later. Lung edema was measured by the Evans blue extravasation technique, and pulmonary neutrophils were determined by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Pulmonary tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-10 (IL-10), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression were analyzed by real-time PCR. TNF-alpha, IL-10, and iNOS proteins in the lung were measured by the enzyme-linked immunoassay technique. LLLT (660 nm, 7.5 J/cm(2)) restored the tracheal hyperresponsiveness and hyporesponsiveness in all the periods after intestinal reperfusion. Although LLLT reduced edema and MPO activity, it did not do so in all the postreperfusion periods. It was also observed with the ICAM-1 expression. In addition to reducing both TNF-alpha and iNOS, LLLT increased IL-10 in the lungs of animals subjected to i-I/R. The results indicate that LLLT can control the lung’s inflammatory response and the airway reactivity dysfunction by simultaneously reducing both TNF-alpha and iNOS.

Lasers Med Sci 2012 May 5

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22562449

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Effect of cerebral cortex sulci on near-infrared light propagation during monitoring and treatment

Ting Li, Qingming Luo, and Steven L. Jacques

Oregon Health and Science University, United States Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China

Central sulcus substantially affects NIRS/NIRI spatial sensitivity and LLLT fluence rate in the study of light transport within a high-resolution 3D anatomical head structure, allowing deeper penetration of light than previous models predicted.

Biomedical Optics Conference Paper, BIOMED, New Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications (BW4B) Miami, Florida April 28, 2012

http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=BIOMED-2012-BW4B.6

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Far-infrared therapy induces the nuclear translocation of PLZF which inhibits VEGF-induced proliferation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

Hsu YH, Chen YC, Chen TH, Sue YM, Cheng TH, Chen JR, Chen CH

Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan.

Many studies suggest that far-infrared (FIR) therapy can reduce the frequency of some vascular-related diseases. The non-thermal effect of FIR was recently found to play a role in the long-term protective effect on vascular function, but its molecular mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the biological effect of FIR on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that FIR ranging 3 approximately 10 microm significantly inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation in HUVECs. According to intensity and time course analyses, the inhibitory effect of FIR peaked at an effective intensity of 0.13 mW/cm(2) at 30 min. On the other hand, a thermal effect did not inhibit VEGF-induced proliferation in HUVECs. FIR exposure also inhibited the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in HUVECs. FIR exposure further induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO generation in VEGF-treated HUVECs. Both VEGF-induced NO and reactive oxygen species generation was involved in the inhibitory effect of FIR. Nitrotyrosine formation significantly increased in HUVECs treated with VEGF and FIR together. Inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) by wortmannin abolished the FIR-induced phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt in HUVECs. FIR exposure upregulated the expression of PI3K p85 at the transcriptional level. We further found that FIR exposure induced the nuclear translocation of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF) in HUVECs. This induction was independent of a thermal effect. The small interfering RNA transfection of PLZF blocked FIR-increased PI3K levels and the inhibitory effect of FIR. These data suggest that FIR induces the nuclear translocation of PLZF which inhibits VEGF-induced proliferation in HUVECs.

PLoS One 2012 7(1) e30674

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22292015

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Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy (660 nm) on Acute Inflammation Induced by Tenotomy of Achilles Tendon in Rats.

Laraia EM, Silva IS, Pereira DM, Dos Reis FA, Albertini R, de Almeida P, Leal Junior EC, de Carvalho PD

Post Graduate Program for Health and Development of the Central-West Region, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil Post Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil Post Graduate Program in Biophotonics, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

In this study we aimed to analyze the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) (660 nm) on levels of protein expression of inflammatory mediators after cutting Achilles tendon of rats. Thirty Wistar male rats underwent partial incisions of the left Achilles tendon, and were divided into three groups of 10 animals according to the time of euthanasia after injury: 6, 24 and 72 hours. Each group was then divided into control group and LLLT group (treated with 100 mW, 3.57 W/cm(2) , 0.028 cm(2), 214 J/cm(2) , 6 J, 60 sec, single point). In LLLT group animals were treated once time per day until the time of euthanasia established for each group. The group treated with LLLT showed a significant reduction of IL-1beta compared to control groups at three time points (6h: p=0.0401; 24h: p=0.0015; 72h: p=0.0463). The analysis of IL-6 showed significant reduction only in the LLLT group at 72 h compared to control group (p=0.0179) while IL-10 showed a significant increase in the treated group compared with control group at three experimental times (6h: p=0.0007; 24h: p=0.0256; 72h: p
Photochem Photobiol 2012 May 21

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22621670

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Technical Parameters for Laser Acupuncture to Elicit Peripheral and Central Effects: State-of-the-Art and Short Guidelines Based on Results from the Medical University of Graz, the German Academy of Acupuncture, and the Scientific Literature.

Litscher G, Opitz G

The Stronach Research Unit for Complementary and Integrative Laser Medicine, Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, and TCM Research Center Graz, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 29, 8036 Graz, Austria.

The scientific literature in the area of laser acupuncture is rather large; however, the actual mechanisms and effects have not yet been proven in detail. Since the early days of laser acupuncture, there are still many open questions concerning technical parameters of this innovative technique. In this paper, we report about the most important technical parameters (wavelength, output power, power density, energy density, dose range, and continuous or pulsed laser) for laser acupuncture and present quantitative results for optimal laser stimulation, which allow eliciting reproducible effects in the periphery and in the brain. There are several position statements on laser acupuncture and also several review articles in scientific literature concerning clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture. For example, the Australian Medical Acupuncture College stated recently that “the optimal energy density for laser acupuncture and biostimulation, based on current clinical experience, is 4 J/cm(2)”. However, our results of previous research studies and of this paper clearly show that dose must be adjusted according to the individual responses.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2012 2012 697096

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22619693

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The influence of red laser irradiation timeline on burn healing in rats.

Nunez SC, Franca CM, Silva DF, Nogueira GE, Prates RA, Ribeiro MS

Centro de Lasers e Aplicacoes, IPEN-CNEN/Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) promotes biomodulation of wound healing and literature reports that light delivery during the inflammation could play a different role compared with latter phases of the healing process. The objective of this study was to investigate whether single dose of a red laser (lambda = 660 nm) is different from fractionated delivery protocol in full thickness burns. Two lesions were inflicted on the back of 36 rats. In the fractionated dose group (FG), the lesions were irradiated with 1 J/cm(2) on days 1, 3, 8, and 10 post-wounding. In the single dose group (SG), the lesions were irradiated with 4 J/cm(2) on day 1, immediately after injury. Control lesions (CG) received no light and were left to heal spontaneously. Blood flow was measured on days 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, and 21 using laser Doppler flowmetry. Animals were killed on days 3, 8, 10, 15, and 21. Skin specimens were obtained and routinely processed for hematoxylin and eosin. The specimens were evaluated according to differential leukocyte counting and angiogenesis. Statistical analysis was performed, and significance was accepted at p < 0.05. Irradiated groups showed a peak of new vessels on day 15 while, for CG, the peak was on day 21. On day 21, FG exhibited a significantly greater number of cumulative neutrophils while SG showed a higher number of mononuclear cells. Our results confirm that both protocols used accelerate angiogenesis and stimulate leukocyte chemotaxis on burn treatment. In addition, this work suggests that a single-dose LLLT accelerates the inflammatory phase of skin repair.

Lasers Med Sci 2012 May 23

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22618156

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The Low Level Laser Therapy Effect on the Remodeling of Bone Extracellular Matrix.

de Souza Merli LA, de Medeiros VP, Toma L, Reginato RD, Katchburian E, Nader HB, Faloppa F

Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of Biochemistry Department of Morphology and Genetics from Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an option to accelerate the regeneration of bone tissue. In this study, both femurs of male Wistar rats (30 animals) were injured with a drill and the effect of LLLT using a laser diode (100 mW at 660 nm) in the bone matrix on the left paw measured. LLLT effect on the healing bone tissue matrix was evaluated by a combination of immunohistochemical histomorphometry, confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and isolation and characterization of glycosaminoglycans. Histomorphometric analysis showed that LLLT increased bone matrix and showing more organized. Alcian Blue and PAS staining seems to suggest differential glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins. The data showed increased expression of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid, after reduction as the LLLT and mature bone, resembling the expression of osteonectin and biglycan. The difference in expression of siblings (DMP-1, OPN and BSP) is in accordance with the repair accelerated bone formation after the application of LLLT as compared to control. The expression of osteonectin and osteocalcin supports their role in bone mineralization protein, indicating that LLLT accelerates this process. The overall data shows that LLLT bone changes dynamic array, shortening the time period involved in the bone repair. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology (c) 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

Photochem Photobiol 2012 May 14

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22582845

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Effect of low level laser therapy and zoledronate on the viability and ALP activity of Saos-2 cells.

Bayram H, Kenar H, Tasar F, Hasirci V

Hacettepe University, Fac. of Dentistry, Dept. of OMFS, Ankara, Turkey.

A limited number of clinical studies indicate the supportive role of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on medical and/or surgical approaches carried out in treatment modalities for bisphosphonate related necrosis of jaws (BRONJ), the most common side effect of bisphosphonates used to inhibit bone resorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of LLLT on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) treated with different doses of zoledronate, the most potent bisphosphonate. Saos-2 cells were treated with different concentrations of zoledronate and were irradiated with diode laser (wavelength 808nm, 10s, 0.25 or 0.50W). Cell numbers and ALP activity of the cells were determined. LLLT mildly increased the proliferation rate or ALP activity, while zoledronate reduced both. When applied together, LLLT lessened the detrimental effects of zoledronate and improved cell function and/or proliferation. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that LLLT has biostimulative effects on Saos-2 cells, even after treatment with zoledronate. LLLT may serve as a useful supportive method for BRONJ treatment through enhancement of healing by osteoblasts.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2012 May 7

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22571861

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Sino-European transcontinental basic and clinical high-tech acupuncture studies-part 3: violet laser stimulation in anesthetized rats.

Gao XY, Litscher G, Liu K, Zhu B

Stronach Research Unit for Complementary and Integrative Laser Medicine, Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, TCM Research Center Graz, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 29, 8036 Graz, Austria.

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of violet laser stimulation on three acupuncture points in anesthetized rats and to test the hypothesis that violet laser light can modulate neurovegetative parameters like heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Recordings were performed in 10 male anesthetized rats under three conditions in Beijing, and monitored with equipment from Graz, where also data analysis was performed. For stimulation a violet laser (emitted wavelength 405 nm, laser output 1 mW, continuous mode) was used. The electrocardiograms were recorded by an HRV Medilog AR12 system during laser acupuncture stimulation of the head, ear, and body (Baihui, “heart” ear acupoint, Zusanli). HR changed significantly only during (P = 0.013) and after (P = 0.038) stimulation at Baihui. Total HRV and the low frequency/high frequency ratio showed insignificant changes. There was an insignificant decrease in MAP after stimulation of Baihui acupoint. Violet laser stimulation offers a method to induce acute effects in HR and HRV in rats. Although the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be determined, alterations are significant. Violet laser stimulation on the Baihui acupoint could readily be translated to clinical studies.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2012 2012 402590

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22570672

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Low-level laser therapy induces the expressions of BMP-2, osteocalcin, and TGF-beta1 in hypoxic-cultured human osteoblasts.

Pyo SJ, Song WW, Kim IR, Park BS, Kim CH, Shin SH, Chung IK, Kim YD

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Beomeo, Mulgum, Yangsan, 626-770, Republic of Korea.

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the cell viability and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1s (HIF-1s), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), osteocalcin, type I collagen, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and Akt in hypoxic-cultured human osteoblasts. Human fetal osteoblast cells (cell line 1.19) were cultured under 1 % oxygen tension for 72 h. Cell cultures were divided into two groups. At the experimental side, low-level laser (808 nm, GaAlAs diode) was applied at 0, 24, and 48 h. After irradiation, each cell culture was incubated 24 h more under hypoxia. Total energy was 1.2, 2.4, and 3.6 J/cm(2), respectively. Non-irradiated cultures served as controls. Comparisons between the two groups were analyzed by t test; a p value
Lasers Med Sci 2012 May 3

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22552925

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Low-Level Laser Therapy and Calcitonin in Bone Repair: Densitometric Analysis

Tatiana Pinto Ribeiro,1 Simone Bustamante Nascimento,1 Claúdia Alessandra Cardoso,1 Raduan Hage,2 Janete Dias Almeida,3 and Emilia Angela Loschiavo Arisawa4

1Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil 2Health Science Faculty, Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil 3Department of Biosciences and Oral Diagnosis, São José dos Campos Dental School, São Paulo State University (UNESP), 12245-000 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil 4Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory, Research and Development Institute (IP&D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil

The aim of this work was to evaluate the association of low-level laser therapy (LLLT, 830 nm) and calcitonin in bone repair considering that bone healing remains a challenge to health professionals. Calcitonin has antiosteoclastic action and LLLT is a treatment that uses low-level lasers or light-emitting diodes to alter cellular function. Both are used to improve bone healing. Densitometry is a clinical noninvasive valuable tool used to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD). Sixty male rats were submitted to bone defect with a trephine bur, randomly divided into four groups of 15 animals each: control (C); synthetic salmon calcitonin (Ca); LLLT (La); LLLT combined with calcitonin (LaCa). Animals from Ca and LaCa received 2 UI/Kg synthetic salmon calcitonin intramuscularly on alternate days after surgery. Animals from groups La and LaCa were treated with infrared LLLT (830 nm, 10 mW, 20 J/cm2, 6 s, contact mode). Five animals from each group were euthanized 7, 14, and 21 days after surgery and bone defects were analyzed by densitometry. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in BMD values in LaCa group at 7 and 21 days ( = 0,005). The results of the densitometric study showed that LLLT (830 nm) combined with calcitonin improved bone repair.

International Journal of Photoenergy Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 829587, 5 pages

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijp/2012/829587/

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Topical therapies for Oral Lichen Planus management and their efficacy: a narrative review.

Bagan J, Compilato D, Paderni C, Panzarella V, Picciotti M, Lorenzini G, Di Fede O

Valencia University. Chairman Service of Stomatology. University General Hospital. Valencia. Avda de Tres Cruces s/n 46014 – Valencia, Spain. bagan@uv.es.

Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition implicating T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and involving oral mucosal surfaces. Several therapeutic regimens have been evaluated to treat OLP and pain related, but often without high level of evidence. Topical formulations are the favourite for the majority of cases; bioadhesive formulations have been considered very useful and practical for local drug delivery in oral mucosa, due to the increased residence time on the oral mucosa of the dosage forms and better therapeutic efficacy. In this narrative review, authors try to illustrate the current topical managements for OLP from the accessible literature on this topic. Steroids are very helpful in discomfort and making better quality of life: they are considered the first-line treatment even if they could cause secondary candidosis, and sometimes bad taste, nausea, dry mouth, sore throat or swollen mouth. Other substances or devices by topical administration are adopted especially when the first line approach is refractory, this is the case when retinol with its synthetic and natural analogues (retinoids), hyaluronic acid, or Aloe Vera are chosen. Recent topical applications for OLP therapy include phototherapy and low/high energy pulsing light; the treatment with extracorporeal photochemotherapy is also reasonable and promising. Finally, calcineurin inhibitors (i.e. cyclosporine, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus), antioxidant and biologics (i.e alefacept, efalizumab, basiliximab, TNF-a inhibitors – infliximab, rituximab) may be alternative approaches when OLP does not respond to the standard protocols. In this scenario, there are several studies on molecules different from glucocorticosteroids, but not sufficient or statistically adequate to justify their evidence based use in OLP; large randomized placebo controlled trials are required to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of these non conventional therapies. In conclusion, since OLP is a chronic disease and requires long-term management, the dental/medical practitioner, who treats OLP patients, needs to know the natural history of OLP, how to monitor, and how to treat, taking in account all of the available modalities conventional and not, with pros and cons.

Curr Pharm Des 2012 May 25

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22632394

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Abstracts of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery. April 18-22, 2012. Kissimmee, Florida, USA.

Lasers Surg Med 2012 Mar 44 Suppl 24 1-94

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22430604

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The diode laser in treating ulcerative oral lesions.

van As G

Dent Today 2011 Dec 30(12) 112

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22324112

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Present and new techniques and devices in the treatment of DFU: a critical review of evidence.

Gottrup F, Apelqvist J

Department of Dermatology, D42, Copenhagen Wound Healing Center, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen NV, Denmark. fgottrup@post4.tele.dk

Management of foot ulcer in individuals with diabetes remains a major therapeutic challenge throughout the world. We performed a critical review of evidence of present and new techniques and devices in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. The golden standard for optimal evidence in the Cochrane system is level I – randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses of several randomized controlled trials. Available evidence on different types of wound debridement; use of antimicrobials; use of dressings in wounds; topical negative pressure, hyperbaric oxygen treatment; electrical, electromagnetic, laser, shockwave, and ultrasound therapies; growth and cell biology factors; cell products and tissue engineering; bioengineered skin and skin grafts; and adjuvant therapies were evaluated. The results of this review show that there is limited evidence on the highest level to justify a change in routine clinical practice. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence, because the studies are often based on inadequate sample size, short follow-up, nonrandom allocation to treatment arms, nonblinded assessment of outcomes, poor description of control, and concurrent intervention. The heterogeneity of the population (of both people and ulcers), with multiple factors contributing to both ulcer onset and failure to heal, makes the trial design difficult in this field. Another fundamental reason for the lack of evidence is the general use of the outcome measure ‘complete healing’. In conclusion, when the results of this updated review are taken together with those of the earlier reports, they provide limited evidence to justify a change in routine clinical practice. For this reason, there is an urgent need to increase the quality of clinical studies. A re-evaluation of which type of research is acceptable for producing evidence in the wound area may be important in the future.

Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2012 Feb 28 Suppl 1 64-71

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22271726

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Laser dentistry, current advantages, and limits.

Nammour S

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 30(1) 1-4

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22217257

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Simple Low Level Laser Therapy device approach

S Stanescu and P.D Cristea

Low Level Laser Therapy is an application of light over the injuries or lesions to improve the healing. When the correct intensity and treatment times are used, laser light can reduce oxidative stress and increases the Adenosine Tri-Phosphate which improves cell’s metabolism and increases its health. The aim of this work is to develop a genuine low level laser therapy device consisting of a main unit and four probes which allow the user to select the modulation frequency, the exposure time and the laser power density delivered to the irradiated surface. It were designed a seven convergent beams probe which provides a wavelength of 655 nm, a single beam probe with a wavelength of 808 nm and another two probes consisting of 19 and 13 laser diodes at a wavelength of 635 nm. The hardware has a simplified approach while the device has a comprehensive genuine embedded firmware achieved in Flowcode®-4, a visual programming tool for microcontrollers

2012 Systems, Signals and Image Processing (IWSSIP), 2012 19th International Conference pp. 44–47

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=4054359&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D4054359

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Conservative Treatment: LASER (Biostimulation and Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment)

Paolo Vescovi

Several studies have shown a positive effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) using different wavelengths (argon, CO2, He-neon, Er:YAG, diode, Nd:YAG, and KTP) on the healing process in a wide range of cutaneous, mucosal, and bone disorders. LLLT reportedly stimulates osteoclast activity to promote bone resorption and remodeling. Soft-tissue healing is also improved by LLLT. The transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts can accelerate the healing of skin and mucosa. In particular, in conditions characterized by avascular necrosis, such as bisphosphonates-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (BIONJ), it is essential to stimulate vascularization and soft-tissue tropism through an increase in blood flow by means of angiogenesis, capillary growth, and an increase in growth factor release. Laser can be used in the conservative surgical treatment of BIONJ patients. The procedure involves the vaporization of necrotic bone until healthy bone is reached. The minimal penetration of the erbium laser (0.1 mm) guarantees safety and allows for precise, minimally invasive surgery, inducing a much lower increase in bone temperature than conventional rotary tools (cold ablation). One undoubted advantage of this technique for BIONJ patients is the bactericidal action of the laser beam, in particular versus Actinomyces and anaerobes species. These considerations support the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of jawbone and mucosal defects related to BIONJ development or following tooth extractions in patients under bisphosphonates therapy. Thus, minimally invasive laser-assisted surgical treatment appears to be a promising approach for BIONJ management.

http://rd.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-88-470-2083-2_12

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Surgical Approach and Laser Applications in BRONJ Osteoporotic and Cancer Patients.

Vescovi P, Merigo E, Meleti M, Manfredi M, Fornaini C, Nammour S

Oral Medicine, Pathology and Laser-Assisted Surgery Unit and Section of Dentistry, Department of ENT/Dental/Ophthalmological and Cervico-Facial Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14-43100 Parma, Italy.

Bisphosphonates-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ) has been reported with increasing frequency in literature over last years, but its therapy is still a dilemma. One hundred ninety patients affected by BRONJ were observed between January 2004 and November 2011 and 166 treated sites were subdivided in five groups on the basis of the therapeutical approach (medical or surgical, traditional or laser-assisted approach, with or without Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)). Clinical success has been defined for each treatment performed as clinical improvement or complete mucosal healing. Combination of antibiotic therapy, conservative surgery performed with Er:YAG laser and LLLT applications showed best results for cancer and noncancer patients. Nonsurgical approach performed on 69 sites induced an improvement in 35 sites (50.7%) and the complete healing in 19 sites (27.5%), while surgical approach on 97 sites induced an improvement in 84 sites (86.6%) and the complete healing in 78 sites (80.41%). Improvement and healing were recorded in 31 (81.5%) and 27 (71.5%) out of the 38 BRONJ sites treated in noncancer patients and in 88 (68.75%) and in 69 (53.9%) out of the 128 in cancer patients.

J Osteoporos 2012 2012 585434

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22645701

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About James Carroll

Founder and CEO at THOR Photomedicine Ltd. About THOR
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