Low Level Laser Therapy LLLT / Cold Laser Literature watch for Jan 2012

17 papers published this month including LLLT for amblyopia, chronic periodontitis, knee osteoarthritis, cracked nipples in breastfeeding mothers, chronic gingivitis, allergic rhinitis and an editorial written by Prof. Jan Bjordal regarding WALT dosage recommendations. He describes how far we have come and the importance of the WALT dosage recommendations. No abstract is available for editorials so I have prepared one for you along with a short feature on Prof. Jan Bjordal and a summary of his published work.

Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and WALT Dosage Recommendations

No abstract is available for editorials so I have prepared one for you along with a short feature on Prof. Jan Bjordal and a summary of his published work. click here.

Low-Level Laser Therapy Improves Visual Acuity in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Amblyopia.

Ivandic BT, Ivandic T

1 University of Heidelberg , Otto-Meyerhof Center, Heidelberg, Germany .

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on visual acuity in adolescent and adult patients with amblyopia. Background data: Currently, amblyopia can be treated successfully only in children. Methods: In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 178 patients (mean age 46.8 years) with amblyopia caused by ametropia (110 eyes) or strabismus (121 eyes) were included. For LLLT, the area of the macula was irradiated through the conjunctiva from 1 cm distance for 30 sec with laser light (780 nm, 292 Hz, 1:1 duty cycle; average power 7.5 mW; spot area 3 mm(2)). The treatment was repeated on average 3.5 times, resulting in a mean total dose of 0.77 J/cm(2). No occlusion was applied, and no additional medication was administered. Best corrected distant visual acuity was determined using Snellen projection optotypes. In 12 patients (12 eyes), the multifocal visual evoked potential (M-VEP) was recorded. A control group of 20 patients (20 eyes) received mock treatment. Results: Visual acuity improved in approximately 90% of the eyes treated with LLLT (p
Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 11

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22235969

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Effect of Adjunctive Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) on Nonsurgical Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis.

Makhlouf M, Dahaba MM, Tuner J, Eissa SA, Harhash TA

1 Laser Institute , Cairo, Egypt .

Abstract Objective: The aim of this split-mouth, double blinded, short-term, controlled clinical trial was to study the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for treatment of chronic periodontitis. Background data: LLLT is reported to improve the outcome of traditional SRP, but the evidence is still weak. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients with a probing pocket depth (PPD) of 4-6 mm involving at least three teeth in each quadrant were recruited for the study. Afterwards, SRP quadrants were randomly assigned for 10 sessions of LLLT. Results: Results showed that when compared to sites treated with SRP alone, those treated with SRP+LLLT (10 sessions, 830 nm, 100 mW, 3 J per point, 3 J/cm(2)) exhibited greater reductions in PPD at 5 weeks and 3 months but not at 6 months. Further, SRP+LLLT-treated sites had a statistically significant increase in mean radiographic bone density when comparing 6- and 12-month data and overall from baseline to 12 months. There was a trend to reduce interleukin (IL)-1beta but the difference between control and laser sites was not statistically significant. Conclusions: SRP combined with LLLT improved radiographic bone density and short-term PPD reduction in patients with chronic periodontitis, but did not significantly affect either the gingival crevicular fluid of IL-1beta or the gingival or plaque index.

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 10

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22233558

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Analgesic effect of high intensity laser therapy in knee osteoarthritis.

Stiglic-Rogoznica N, Stamenkovic D, Frlan-Vrgoc L, Avancini-Dobrovic V, Vrbanic TS

Center of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Rijeka University Hospital Center, Rijeka, Croatia.

Knee osteoarthritis (KOA), the most common type of osteoarthritis (OA), is associated with pain and inflammation of the joint capsule, impaired muscular stabilization, reduced range of motion and functional disability. High-intensity laser therapy (HILT) involves higher-intensity laser radiation and causes minor and slow light absorption by chromophores. Light stimulation of the deep structures, due to high intensity laser therapy, activates cell metabolism through photochemical effect. The transmissions of pain stimulus are slowed down and result in a quick achievement of pain relief. The aim of our research was to investigate the prompt analgesic effect of HILT on patients with KOA. Knee radiographs were performed on all patients and consequently graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale (K/L). A group of 96 patients (75 female, 21 male, mean age 59.2) with K/L 2 and 3 were submitted to HILT therapy. Pain intensity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the treatment. HILT consisted in one daily application, over a period of ten days, using protocol wavelength, frequency and duration. The results showed statistically significant decrease in VAS after the treatment (p < 0.001). Considering these results, HILT enables prompt analgesic effects in KOA treatment. Therefore HILT is a reliable option in KOA physical therapy.

Coll Antropol 2011 Sep 35 Suppl 2 183-5

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22220431

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LED Phototherapy Improves Healing of Nipple Trauma: A Pilot Study.

Chaves ME, Araujo AR, Santos SF, Pinotti M, Oliveira LS

1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais , Belo Horionte, Brazil .

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a LED phototherapy prototype apparatus in the healing of nipple trauma in breastfeeding women. Background data: There is no scientific evidence of an effective treatment for nipple trauma. Methods: The experimental group was treated with orientation on nipple care and adequate breastfeeding techniques in addition to active LED phototherapy. The control group was treated with orientation on nipple care and adequate breastfeeding techniques in addition to placebo LED phototherapy. Participants were treated twice a week, for a total of eight sessions. Healing of the nipple lesions was measured by a reduction in their area, and decrease in pain intensity was measured in accordance with an 11-point Pain Intensity Numerical Rating Scale and a standard 7-point patient global impression of change. Results: Statistically significant reductions in measured nipple lesion area (p
Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 27

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22283620

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Chronic gingivitis: the prevalence of periodontopathogens and therapy efficiency.

Igic M, Kesic L, Lekovic V, Apostolovic M, Mihailovic D, Kostadinovic L, Milasin J

Department of Children and Preventive Dentistry, Dental Clinic, Medical Faculty Nis, University of Nis, Bul dr Zorana Djindjica 52, 18000, Nis, Serbia, igicmarija@gmail.com.

The purpose of this study was to determine the level of gingival inflammation and the prevalence of periodontopathogenic microorganisms in adolescents with chronic gingivitis, as well as to compare the effectiveness of two approaches in gingivitis treatment-basic therapy alone and basic therapy + adjunctive low-level laser therapy (LLLT). After periodontal evaluation, the content of gingival pockets of 140 adolescents with gingivitis was analyzed by multiplex PCR for the presence of P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, T. forsythensis and P. intermedia. Subsequent to bacteria detection, the examinees were divided into two groups with homogenous clinical and microbiological characteristics. Group A was subjected to basic gingivitis therapy, and group B underwent basic therapy along with adjunctive LLLT. A statistically significant difference between the values of plaque-index (PI) and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) before and after therapy was confirmed in both groups (p < 0.001), though more pronounced in group B. Following therapy, the incidence of periodontopathogenic microorganisms decreased considerably. The best result was obtained in P. gingivalis eradication by combined therapy (p = 0.003). The presence of periodontopathogens in adolescents with gingivitis should be regarded as a sign for dentists to foster more effective oral health programs. LLLT appears to be beneficial as adjuvant to basic therapy.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2012 Jan 6

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22222990

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Endonasal phototherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis/hayfever.

Hili S, Wong B, Fu B, Oyarzabal M

Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Medway Maritime Hospital, Windmill Road, Gillingham, Kent, UK. E-mail: bpkfu@yahoo.co.uk.

Clin Otolaryngol 2011 Dec 36(6) 589-91

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22212547

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Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and World Association for Laser Therapy (WALT) Dosage Recommendations.

Bjordal JM

Department of Evidence-Based Practice, Bergen University College , Bergen, Norway .

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 10

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22233559

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Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 Mice by Photobiomodulation Induced by 670 nm Light.

Muili KA, Gopalakrishnan S, Meyer SL, Eells JT, Lyons JA

Department of Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America.

BACKGROUND: The approved immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) are only partially effective. It is thought that the combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective strategies is necessary to prevent or reverse disease progression. Irradiation with far red/near infrared light, termed photobiomodulation, is a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Data suggests that near-infrared light functions through neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We sought to investigate the clinical effect of photobiomodulation in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The clinical effect of photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model of EAE. Disease was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) according to standard laboratory protocol. Mice received 670 nm light or no light treatment (sham) administered as suppression and treatment protocols. 670 nm light reduced disease severity with both protocols compared to sham treated mice. Disease amelioration was associated with down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10) in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies document the therapeutic potential of photobiomodulation with 670 nm light in the EAE model, in part through modulation of the immune response.

PLoS One 2012 7(1) e30655

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22292010

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Effects of a Therapeutic Laser and Passive Stretching Program for Treating Tendon Overuse.

Ng GY, Chung PY

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University , Hong Kong (SAR), China .

Abstract Objective: This study investigated the effects of a therapeutic laser, passive stretching, and their combined treatment on the strength of Achilles tendons with overuse pathologies. Background data: Tendinopathy involving overuse is usually treated with exercise and stretching, but there has been no report on the treatment effect of a therapeutic laser combined with passive stretching on managing this condition. Despite the beneficial effect of a therapeutic laser on healing tendons that have had traumatic injury, its effect on degenerative tendons is not known. Methods: Twenty-five mature Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used, with 20 subjected to daily bipedal downhill running for 8 weeks, to induce Achilles overuse, and 5 as normal controls. The exercised rats were divided into four groups: 1, laser treatment; 2, passive stretching; 3, combined laser and stretching; and 4, no treatment, running controls. GaAlAs laser with 660 nm wavelength was applied to both Achilles tendons for 50 sec for Groups 1 and 3. Passive stretching of 20 times/10 sec of maximum ankle plantar flexion was applied to Groups 2 and 3. Treatments were applied after each running session for a a total of 56 treatment sessions. On week 9, the tendons were tested for load-relaxation, stiffness, and ultimate strength. Results: Stiffness was different (p=0.01), difference in ultimate strength was marginally insignificant (p=0.07), and load-relaxation difference was not significant among groups. Post-hoc analyses revealed that the mean stiffness of all the four exercise groups was lower than the normal control, whereas the ultimate strength from the laser and combined laser and stretching was not different from that of the normal control group, but was higher than that of the passive stretching and no treatment groups. Conclusions: We conclude that a therapeutic laser and combined laser with passive stretching might slow down the decrease in Achilles tendon strength but would not be able to stop the pathological changes of overuse from developing.

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 11

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22235970

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Photobiomodulation enhances nigral dopaminergic cell survival in a chronic MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

Peoples C, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J

Discipline of Anatomy & Histology F13, University of Sydney, Australia.

We have shown previously that photobiomodulation or near-infrared light (NIr) treatment protects dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in an acute MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this study, we tested the protective and rescue action of NIr treatment in a chronic MPTP model, developed to resemble more closely the slow progressive degeneration in PD patients. We examined three regions of dopaminergic cells, the SNc, periaqueductal grey matter (PaG) and zona incerta-hypothalamus (ZI-Hyp). BALB/c mice had MPTP or saline injections over five weeks, followed by a three-week survival. NIr treatment was applied either at the same time as (simultaneous series) or after (post-treatment series) the MPTP insult. There were four groups within each series; Saline, Saline-NIr, MPTP and MPTP-NIr. Brains were processed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunochemistry and cell number was analysed using the optical fractionator method. In the SNc, there was a significant reduction ( approximately 45%) in TH(+) cell number in the MPTP groups compared to the saline controls of both series. In the MPTP-NIr groups of both series, TH(+) cell number was significantly higher ( approximately 25%) than in the MPTP groups, but lower than in the saline controls ( approximately 20%). By contrast in the PaG and ZI-Hyp, there were no significant differences in TH(+) cell number between the MPTP an MPTP-NIr groups of either series. In summary, exposure to NIr either at the same time or well after chronic MPTP insult saved many SNc dopaminergic cells from degeneration.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2012 Jan 27

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22285756

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Low-level laser therapy for closed-head traumatic brain injury in mice: effect of different wavelengths.

Wu Q, Xuan W, Ando T, Xu T, Huang L, Huang YY, Dai T, Dhital S, Sharma SK, Whalen MJ, Hamblin MR

Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, China.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects millions worldwide and is without effective treatment. One area that is attracting growing interest is the use of transcranial low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to treat TBI. The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain would allow non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. LLLT may treat TBI by increasing respiration in the mitochondria, causing activation of transcription factors, reducing inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress, and inhibiting apoptosis. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested LLLT in a mouse model of closed-head TBI produced by a controlled weight drop onto the skull. Mice received a single treatment with continuous-wave 665, 730, 810, or 980 nm lasers (36 J/cm(2) delivered at 150 mW/cm(2) ) 4-hour post-TBI and were followed up by neurological performance testing for 4 weeks. RESULTS: Mice with moderate-to-severe TBI treated with 665 and 810 nm laser (but not with 730 or 980 nm) had a significant improvement in Neurological Severity Score that increased over the course of the follow-up compared to sham-treated controls. Morphometry of brain sections showed a reduction in small deficits in 665 and 810 nm laser treated mouse brains at 28 days. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of 810 nm agrees with previous publications, and together with the effectiveness of 660 nm and non-effectiveness of 730 and 980 nm can be explained by the absorption spectrum of cytochrome oxidase, the candidate mitochondrial chromophore in transcranial LLLT. Lasers Surg. Med. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Lasers Surg Med 2012 Jan 24

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22275301

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Low-Level Laser Irradiation Affects the Release of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I), and Receptor of IGF-I (IGFBP3) from Osteoblasts.

Saygun I, Nizam N, Ural AU, Serdar MA, Avcu F, Tozum TF

1 Department of Periodontology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy , Ankara, Turkey .

Abstract Objective: It was the aim of the present study to evaluate whether the laser irradiation of osteoblasts could enhance the release of growth factors including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and receptor of IGF-I (IGFBP3). Background data: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been shown to have biostimulatory effects on various cell types by enhancing production of some cytokines and growth factors. Materials and methods: Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded in osteogenic medium and differentiated into osteoblasts. Three groups were formed: in the first group (single dose group), osteoblasts were irradiated with laser (685 nm, 25 mW, 14.3 mW/cm(2), 140 sec, 2 J/cm(2)) for one time; and in the second group, energy at the same dose was applied for 2 consecutive days (double dose group). The third group was not irradiated with laser and served as the control group. Proliferation, viability, bFGF, IGF-I, and IGFBP3 levels were compared between groups. Results: Both of the irradiated groups revealed higher proliferation, viability, bFGF, IGF-I, and IGFBP3 expressions than did the nonirradiated control group. There was increase in bFGF and IGF-I expressions and decrease in IGFBP3 in the double dose group compared to single dose group. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that LLLT increases the proliferation of osteoblast cells and stimulates the release of bFGF, IGF-I, and IGFBP3 from these cells. The biostimulatory effect of LLLT may be related to the enhanced production of the growth factors.

Photomed Laser Surg 2012 Jan 11

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22235971

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Effect of low-level laser irradiation on osteoblast proliferation and bone formation.

Grassi FR, Ciccolella F, D’Apolito G, Papa F, Iuso A, Salzo AE, Trentadue R, Nardi GM, Scivetti M, De Matteo M, Silvestris F, Ballini A, Inchingolo F, Dipalma M, Scacco S, Tete S

Department of Clinical Methodology and Medical Surgery Technology, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.

Applications of laser therapy in biostimulation and healing injured tissues are widely described in medical literature. The present study focuses on the effects of laser irradiation on the growth rate and differentiation of human osteoblast-like cells seeded on titanium or zirconia surfaces. Cells were laser irradiated with low therapeutical doses at different intervals and the effects of irradiation were evaluated at each time-point. After 3 hours lasered cells showed an enhanced mitogen activity compared to non-lasered control cells and a higher alkaline phosphatase activity, marker of bone formation. At the same time, the mRNA of RUNX2 and OSTERIX, two genes involved in osteoblast differentiation, showed a clear decrease in lasered cells. This reached the lowest value 6 to 12 hours after irradiation, after which the transcripts started to increase, indicating that the laser treatment did promote the osteogenic potential of growth-induced cells. These results indicate that Low Level Laser Treatment (LLLT) stimulates osteogenic cell proliferation.

J Biol Regul Homeost Agents 2011 Oct-Dec 25(4) 603-14

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22217992

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Current acute stroke trials and their potential impact on the therapeutic time window.

Schellinger PD, Kohrmann M

Department of Neurology and Neurogeriatry, JW Klinikum Minden, Germany. peter.schellinger@klinikum-minden.de.

Several trials in acute stroke are underway or have been completed recently. Among the latter, ECASS 3 was a milestone regarding the extension of the rigid 3-h time window out to 4.5 h for intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Several other approaches are being tested for thrombolytic therapy, among them modern imaging-based patient selection of patients and interventional approaches. Other pharmaceutical strategies include neuroprotection, and restoration, biophysical approaches, such as near infrared laser therapy, hemodynamic augmentation, and sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation. This perspective will cover the recently completed and currently recruiting acute stroke trials with respect to their potential role in expanding the therapeutic time window for acute ischemic stroke.

Expert Rev Neurother 2012 Feb 12(2) 169-77

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22288672

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Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Petrucci A, Sgolastra F, Gatto R, Mattei A, Monaco A

Aim: To assess the scientific evidence on the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods: The databases of PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane Clinical Trials Register, and PEDro were manually and electronically searched up to February 2010. Two independent reviewers screened, extracted, and assessed the quality of the publications. A meta-analysis- was performed to quantify the pooled effect of LLLT on pain and function in patients with chronic TMD. Results: The literature search identified 323 papers without overlap between selected databases, but after the two-phase study selection, only six randomized clinical trials (RCT) were included in the systematic review. The primary outcome of interest was the change in pain from baseline to endpoint. The pooled effect of LLLT on pain, measured through a visual analog scale with a mean difference of 7.77 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: -2.49 to 18.02), was not statistically significant from placebo. Change from baseline to endpoint of secondary outcomes was 4.04 mm (95% CI 3.06 to 5.02) for mandibular maximum vertical opening; 1.64 mm (95% CI 0.10 to 3.17) for right lateral excursion and 1.90 mm (95% CI: -4.08 to 7.88) for left lateral excursion. Conclusion: Currently, there is no evidence to support the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of TMD. J Orofac Pain 2011;25:298-307.

J Orofac Pain 2011 Fall 25(4) 298-307

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22247925

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Root surface treatment using diode laser in delayed tooth replantation: radiographic and histomorphometric analyses in rats.

Carvalho ED, Costa FT, Campos MS, Anbinder AL, Neves AC, Habitante SM, Lage-Marques JL, Raldi DP

Department of Dentistry, University of Taubate, Taubate, Sao Paulo Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry of Sao Jose dos Campos, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract – Background aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by radiographic and histomorphometric analyses, the effects of high-power diode laser irradiation on the root surfaces of delayed replanted rat teeth. Material and methods: Maxillary right incisors were extracted from 60 Wistar rats and kept dry for 60 min. Subsequently, the root canals were prepared and filled with calcium hydroxide paste. According to the root surface treatment before the replantation, the teeth were assigned to four groups (n = 15): G1 (negative control) – no root surface treatment; G2 (positive control) – treated with 2% sodium fluoride solution; G3 – irradiated with a high-power diode laser (810 nm, continuous mode, 1.0 W, 30 s); and G4 – irradiated with a diode laser using the same parameters as those used for G3 but in pulsed mode. The rats were euthanized after 15, 30, and 60 days of replantation. The specimens were digitally radiographed and processed for histomorphometric analysis to determine the average root resorption areas and to evaluate the histological events. Results: The percentage of root resorption was in the following order: G1 > G2 > G4 > G3. Both histomorphometric and radiographic analyses showed significantly lower means (P < 0.05) of the occurrence of root resorption in the irradiated groups (G3 and G4) when compared to the control groups (G1 and G2). Replacement resorption and ankylosis were observed in histological sections only after 30 and 60 days; however, such events were not observed in G3. Conclusion: Root surface treatments with high-powered diode laser irradiation prior to delayed replantation reduced the occurrence of external root resorption compared to no treatment or sodium fluoride treatment at up to 60 days.

Dent Traumatol 2012 Jan 12

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22236150

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Acne treatments come out a wash.

Consum Rep 2012 Jan 77(1) 9

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=22232826

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About James Carroll

Founder and CEO at THOR Photomedicine Ltd. About THOR
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1 Response to Low Level Laser Therapy LLLT / Cold Laser Literature watch for Jan 2012

  1. Brian Bennett says:

    I would like to see a rebuttal of the meta anaysis of LLLT in Temporomandibular disorders. This does not jibe with the clinic experience although one always is confronted with placebo effect. Have you asked Jan Tuner about this paper?

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