Low Level Laser Therapy LLLT / Cold Laser Literature watch for Sept 2011

15 new research papers for you this month including LLLT treatments for: osteonecrosis of the jaw in cancer patients, laser vs ultrasound for shoulder myofascial pain syndrome, radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, persistent idiopathic facial pain and a negative study for subacromial impingement syndrome. This negative result is hardly a surprise as the laser was only 6mW. It is a shame the authors did not come on our training course before embarking on this study. There are ten more papers to review including Alzheimer’s disease, TMJ, respiratory diseases in children and a a MUST READ editorial on the effect of LLLT on suppression of activity of peripheral nerve endings by Dr Roberta Chow MD PhD.

Association of laser phototherapy with PRP improves healing of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws in cancer patients: A preliminary study.

Martins MA, Martins MD, Lascala CA, Curi MM, Migliorati CA, Tenis CA, Marques MM

School of Dentistry, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil; Department of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the effect of three different treatments on the healing outcome of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) in cancer patients. Twenty-two cancer patients were treated for BRONJ with one of the following protocols: clinical (pharmacological therapy), surgical (pharmacological plus surgical therapy), or PRP plus LPT (pharmacological plus surgical plus platelet rich plasma (PRP) plus laser phototherapy (LPT). The laser treatment was applied with a continuous diode laser (InGaAlP, 660nm) using punctual and contact mode, 40mW, spot size 0.042 cm(2), 6J/cm(2) (6s) and total energy of 0.24J per point. The irradiations were performed on the exposed bone and surrounding soft tissue. The analysis of demographic data and risk factors was performed by gathering the following information: age, gender, primary tumor, bisphosphonate (BP) used, duration of BP intake, history of chemotherapy, use of steroids, and medical history of diabetes. The association between the current state of BRONJ (with or without bone exposure) and other qualitative variables was determined using the chi-square or Fisher’s exact test. In all tests, the significance level adopted was 5%. Most BRONJ lesions occurred in the mandible (77%) after tooth extraction (55%) and in women (72%). A significantly higher percentage of patients reached the current state of BRONJ without bone exposure (86%) in the PPR plus LPT group than in the pharmacological (0%) and surgical (40%) groups after 1-month follow-up assessment. These results suggest that the association of pharmacological therapy and surgical therapy with PRP plus LPT significantly improves BRONJ healing in oncologic patients. Although prospective studies with larger sample sizes are still needed, this preliminary study may be used to inform a better-designed future study.

Oral Oncol 2011 Sep 20

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21940198

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Comparison of the effects of low energy laser and ultrasound in treatment of shoulder myofascial pain syndrome: a randomized single-blinded clinical trial.

Rayegani S, Bahrami M, Samadi B, Sedighipour L, Mokhtarirad M, Eliaspoor D

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Shohada Medical Center, Shaheed Beheshti Medical University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Ira- bahrami7mh@gmail.com.

BACKGROUND: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal diseases. MPS impaired quality of life in the patients. There is a lot of controversy about different treatment options which include medical treatments, physical therapy, injections, ultrasound and laser. The effects of laser in MPS are challenging. AIM: To assess the effects of laser and ultrasound in treatment of MPS. DESIGN: Randomized single blinded clinical trial SETTING: Outpatient physical therapy clinic at university hospital POPULATION: Sixty three subjects (females: 46, males: 17), (age range: 17-55 year old) who had a diagnosis of definite MPS were entered in the study. METHODS: We measured the pain intensity at rest, during activity and at night using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) questionnaire. The patients also filled the Neck Disability Index (NDI) form and the pain threshold provoked by pressure was determined using algometric assessment. Then, the patients were categorized randomly in groups A, B and C (receiving laser therapy, ultrasound and sham laser therapy, respectively). Six weeks after the initial visit, they were visited again and filled the forms again. RESULTS: Ultrasound was effective in VAS improvement during activity (46%), at rest (39%) and at night (35%). It also improved NDI scores (34%) and algometric assessment (37%). Laser was effective in VAS improving during activity (54%), at night (51%) and at rest (51%) and also improved NDI scores (73%). It was also found effective in algometric assessment improvement (105%). Laser resulted in more NDI score and algometric assessment improvements comparing to ultrasound (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: This study introduces laser as one of the preferred treatments of myofascial pain syndrome in shoulder.

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2011 Sep 47(3) 381-9

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21946400

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Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced mucositis: A double-blind randomized study in head and neck cancer patients.

Carvalho PA, Jaguar GC, Pellizzon AC, Prado JD, Lopes RN, Alves FA

Stomatology Department – Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the effect of the low-level laser in the prevention and treatment of mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. A total of 70 patients with malignant neoplasms in the oral cavity or oropharynx were evaluated. The patients were randomized into two low-level laser therapy groups: Group 1 (660nm/15mW/3.8J/cm(2)/spot size 4mm(2)) or Group 2 (660nm/5mW/1.3J/cm(2)/spot size 4mm(2)) starting on the first day of radiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed daily and weekly using the NCI and WHO scales. Oral pain was scored daily with a visual analogue scale before laser application. The patients in Group 1 had a mean time of 13.5days (range 6-26days) to present mucositis grade II, while the patients in Group 2 had a mean time of 9.8days (range 4-14days) (both WHO and NCI p=0.005). In addition, Group 2 also presented a higher mucositis grade than Group 1 with significant differences found in weeks 2 (p=0.019), 3 (p=0.005) and 4 (p=0.003) for WHO scale and weeks 2 (p=0.009) and 4 (p=0.013) for NCI scale. The patients in Group 1 reported lower pain levels (p=0.004). Low-level laser therapy during radiotherapy was found to be effective in controlling the intensity of mucositis and pain.

Oral Oncol 2011 Sep 10

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21911312

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Treatment of Persistent Idiopathic Facial Pain (PIFP) with a Low-Level Energy Diode Laser.

Yang HW, Huang YF

1 Oral Medicine Center, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital , Taichung City, Taiwan .

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the therapeutic efficacy of low- level energy diode laser on persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP). Background data: PIFP has presented a diagnosis and management challenge to clinicians. Many patients were misdiagnosed, which resulted in unnecessary dental procedures. Low-level energy diode laser therapy has been applied to different chronic and acute pain disorders, including neck, back, and myofacial pain; degenerative osteoarthritis; and headache, and it may be an effective alternative treatment for PIFP. Methods: A total of 16 patients, who were diagnosed with PIFP, were treated with an 800-nm wavelength diode laser. A straight handpiece having an end size of 0.8 cm in diameter, or an angled handpiece with an end size of 0.5 cm in diameter was used. When laser was applied, the handpiece directly contacted the involved symptomatic region with an energy density of 105 J/cm(2). Overall pain and discomfort was analyzed with a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after treatment. Results: All patients received diode laser therapy between 1 and10 times. The average pain score was 7.4 before the treatment (ranging from 2.9 to 9.8), and 4.1 after the treatment. An average pain reduction of 43.87% (ranging from 9.3% to 91.8%) was achieved. The pain remained unchanged at a lower level for up to 12 months. Conclusions: Low-level energy diode laser may be an effective treatment for PIFP.

Photomed Laser Surg 2011 Sep 9

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21905852

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Are ultrasound, laser and exercise superior to each other in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome? A randomized clinical trial.

Calis H, Berberoglu N, Calis M

Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinic, Kayseri, Turkey – mcalis@erciyes.edu.tr.

BACKGROUND: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common reason for shoulder pain. Ultrasound and laser are the physical therapy modalities, in conservative treatment of SIS. AIM: The aim of this study was to define and compare the efficacy of ultrasound, laser and exercise in the treatment of SIS. DESIGN: This was a randomized controlled trial with-pre and post-treatment evaluations SETTING: Out-patients referred to physical medicine and rehabilitation unit. POPULATION: This study was performed on 52 patients with SIS. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups METHODS: The patients were treated five days a week for three weeks with hotpack+ultrasound+exercise (the first group); hotpack+laser+exercise (the second group), or hotpack+exercise (the third group). The pre and post treatment ranges of motion were measured in the patients. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the severity of pain. Constant scoring was used to evaluate the shoulder functions and the results were compared after the treatment. RESULTS: When the post-treatment results of the groups were compared with the pretreatment results, there was a statistically significant improvement in each of the three groups, in the pain, the range of motion and the functional improvement at the shoulder (P<0.05). However, the inter-group comparison did not reveal any statistically significant difference in the parameters indicating improvement (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrated that ultrasound and laser treatments were not superior to each other in the treatment of SIS. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT:. Exercise treatment forms the base for the conservative treatment.

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2011 Sep 47(3) 375-80

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21946399

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[Efficacy evaluation of low-level laser therapy on temporomandibular disorder].

Wang X, Yang Z, Zhang W, Yi X, Liang C, Li X

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. METHODS: The patients with TMJ pain were randomly assigned laser group (n=21) or control group(n=21), once a day for 6 consecutive days of treatment. TMJ pain and function were measured at baseline, just after treatment course, 1 month and 2 months after the treatment. RESULTS: The changes of visual analogue scale (VAS) were appearing over time in both groups but presented statistically significant differences between groups (P<0.001). VAS of laser group decreased faster than that of control group. The same tendency occurred for painless maximum vertical opening (MVO), left lateral excursion (LLE) and right lateral excursion (RLE), which increased faster in laser group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups and evaluation times for protrusion excursion (PE), but an interaction between group and evaluation times existed and should be explored further. CONCLUSION: LLLT is an appropriate treatment for TMJ pain.

Hua Xi Kou Qiang Yi Xue Za Zhi 2011 Aug 29(4) 393-5, 399

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21932661

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[Polarized light acts as epigenetic factor in inhibition of inflammation; a genome wide expression analysis in recurrent respiratory diseases of children].

Falus A, Fenyo M, Eder K, Madarasi A

Semmelweis Egyetem, Altalanos Orvostudomanyi Kar Genetikai, Sejt- es Immunbiologiai Intezet Budapest. faland@dgci.sote.hu

Whole-body polarized light therapy has been primarily investigated in various clinical observations and in a few in vitro model systems. AIMS: In the present study, clinical and molecular effects of whole-body polarized light treatment on children suffering from recurrent respiratory infection were studied. METHODS: Incidence and duration of respiratory symptoms as well as the length of appropriate antibiotic therapy have been measured. Simultaneously, genome-wide gene expression pattern was examined by whole genome cDNA microarray in peripheral lymphocytes of children. RESULTS: Twenty of twenty five children showed a marked clinical improvement, while in five of twenty five had poor or no changes. Gene expression pattern of the peripheral lymphocytes of the patients was compared in favorable and poor responders. Lymphocytes of the children with a documented improved clinical response to polarized light therapy showed a decrease in the expression of chemokine genes, such as CXCL1, CXCL2, IL-8 and in that of the tumor necrosis alpha (TNFalpha) gene. On the contrary, a rapid elevation was found in the expression of gene encoding for CYP4F2, a leukotriene-B(4)-metabolizing enzyme. In children with poor clinical response to polarized light therapy, no similar changes were detected in the gene expression pattern of the lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Improved clinical symptoms and modified gene expression profile of lymphocytes reveals anti-inflammatory effect upon whole body polarized light irradiation.

Orv Hetil 2011 Sep 11 152(37) 1492-9

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21893480

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Inhibition of Abeta(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis by Low-power-laser-irradiation (LPLI) through promoting Akt-dependent YAP cytoplasmic translocation.

Zhang H, Wu S, Xing D

Deposition of amyloid-beta-peptide (Abeta) in the brain is considered a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our previous studies show that Yes-associated protein (YAP) is involved in the regulation of apoptosis induced by Abeta(25-35) through YAP nuclear translocation and its pro-apoptotic function is mediated by its interaction with p73. In the present study, we first found that Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) promoted YAP cytoplasmic translocation and inhibited Abeta(25-35)-induced YAP nuclear translocation. Moreover, the cytoplasmic translocation was in an Akt-dependent manner. Activated Akt by LPLI phosphorylated YAP on ser127 (S127) and resulted in decreasing the interaction between YAP and p73, and in suppressing the proapoptotic gene bax expression following Abeta(25-35) treatment. Inhibition of Akt expression by siRNA significantly abolished the effect of LPLI. More importantly, LPLI could inhibit Abeta(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis through activation of Akt/YAP/p73 signaling pathway. Therefore, our findings first suggest that YAP may be a therapeutic target and these results directly point to a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD through Akt/YAP/p73 signaling pathway with LPLI.

Cell Signal 2011 Sep 14

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21945154

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Infrared (810 nm) low-level laser therapy in rat Achilles tendinitis: A consistent alternative to drugs.

Marcos RL, Junior EC, de Moura Messias F, de Carvalho MH, Pallotta RC, Frigo L, Dos Santos RA, Ramos L, Teixeira S, Bjordal JM, Lopes-Martins RA

Laboratory of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo – Sao Paulo, Brazil. Post Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE) – Sao Paulo – SP, Brazil. Laboratory of Hypertension, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo – Sao Paulo – SP, Brazil. Biological Sciences and Health Center, Cruzeiro do Sul University – Sao Paulo – SP, Brazil. Section of Evidence Based Practice, Bergen University College – Bergen, Norway.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are widely used and can reduce musculoskeletal pain in spite of the cost of adverse reactions like gastrointestinal ulcers or cardiovascular events. The current study investigates if a safer treatment such as low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could reduce tendinitis inflammation, and whether a possible pathway could be through inhibition of either of the two cyclooxygenase isoforms in inflammation. Wistar rats (6 animals/group) were injected with saline (control) or collagenase in their Achilles tendons. Then we treated them with three different doses of infrared LLLT (810nm; 100mW; 10s, 30s and 60s; 5W/cm(2) ; 1J, 3J, 6J) at the sites of the injections, or intramuscular diclofenac, a non-selective COX inhibitor/NSAID. We found that LLLT-dose of 3J significantly reduced inflammation through less COX-2-derived gene expression and PGE(2) production, and less edema formation compared to non-irradiated controls. Diclofenac controls exhibited significantly lower PGE(2) cytokine levels at 6h than collagenase control, but cyclooxygenase isoform 1-derived gene expression and cytokine PGE(2) levels were not affected by treatments. As LLLT seems to act on inflammation through a selective inhibition of the COX-2 isoform in collagenase-induced tendinitis, LLLT may have potential to become a new and safer non-drug alternative to coxibs.

Photochem Photobiol 2011 Sep 12

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21910734

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Phototherapy and the peripheral nervous system.

Chow R

Nerve Research Foundation, Brain and Mind Research Institute, The University of Sydney , Camperdown, NSW, Australia .

Effects of laser irradiation on the peripheral nervous system (PNS) underlie the potential for phototherapy to be acknowledged as a mainstream therapy for the future. Pain and inflammation are among the most important manifesta- tions of PNS function and the spectrum of diseases with these symptoms and signs, from osteoarthritis to diabetic neurop- athy, which can be modified by phototherapy, is vast. Both pain and inflammation are mediated by unmyelin- ated peripheral nerve terminals of small diameter Ad and C fibers, the nociceptors, which lie a few microns below the surface of the skin in the epidermis.1,2 The superficial nature of these fibers means that these important somatosensory nerves are within the penetration depths of all laser and LED wavelengths. These afferent nerve endings connect the out- side world via second order neurons to the midbrain, sub- cortical, and cortical centers of the brain. By transducing noxious heat, cold, and other stimuli to sensory information that is processed into sensation and emotions, the skin is directly connected to the brain. Deeper nerve fascicles and trunks in the dermis and below are also within the pene- tration depths of infrared laser wavelengths as are the nervi vasorum, the nerves supplying blood vessels. Neural in- flammation, which is the phenomenon of inflammation arising from the release of bioactive substances, such as bradykinin, from activated peripheral sensory nerve end- ings, is an important but often unrecognized component of any acute or chronic pain condition.3 This too, in addition to pain, can be inhibited by suppression of activity of peripheral nerve endings. The absorption of photons by this complex neural network of the somatosensory nervous system is one of the mechanisms underlying modulation of pain and inflammation, and is one of the most important applications of phototherapy.

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Photomed Laser Surg 2011 Sep 29(9) 591-2

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21895528

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[Role of endogenous porphyrins in the effects of low-intensity laser radiation of the red region on free radical processes in the blood of rats under experimental endotoxic shock].

The role of endogenous porphyrins in the effects of laser radiation of the red region (632.8 nm) on free radical processes in the blood of rats under endotoxic shock induced by the administration of lipopolysaccharide B (25 mg/kg) has been studied. The measurements of the functional activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (the method of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence), the superoxide dismutase activity of blood plasma (using nitro blue tetrazolium), and the degree of lipid oxidation of erythrocyte membranes (the method of fluorescence of cis-parinaric acid) have been carried out. It has been found that low-intensity laser radiation strongly affects all processes examined irrespective of the administration of lipopolysaccharide B. The effect of radiation was most pronounced in animals injected with the polysaccharide, the changes being dependent on the concentration of endogenous porphyrins in samples.

Biofizika 2011 Jul-Aug 56(4) 705-13

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21950074

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Antiinflammatory effect of low-level laser therapy on Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis in rabbits.

Ma WJ, Li XR, Li YX, Xue ZX, Yin HJ, Ma H

Tianjin Medical University Eye Centre, Tianjin, 300070, China.

A rabbit model of endophthalmitis was established to evaluate the antiinflammatory effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to treatment for Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis. Rabbits were randomly divided into three groups to receive intravitreal injections into their left eye: group A received 0.5 mg vancomycin (100 mul), group B received 0.5 mg vancomycin + 0.2 mg dexamethasone (100 mul), and group C received 0.5 mg vancomycin (100 mul) and continuous wave semiconductor laser irradiation (10 mW, lambda = 632 nm) focused on the pupil. Slit lamp examination and B-mode ultrasonography were conducted to evaluate the symptoms of endophthalmitis. Polymorphonuclear cells and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in aqueous fluid were measured at 0 h, and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 15 days. A histology test was conducted at 15 days. B-mode ultrasonography and histology revealed that groups B and C had less inflammation than group A at 15 days. Groups B and C had fewer polymorphonuclear cells and lower levels of TNF-alpha in aqueous fluid than group A at 2, 3 and 7 days (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between groups B and C (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference between groups A, B and C at 15 days (P > 0.05). As an adjunct to vancomycin therapy to treat S. epidermidis endophthalmitis, LLLT has an antiinflammatory effect similar to that of dexamethasone.

Lasers Med Sci 2011 Sep 27

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21948400

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Effects of low-level laser irradiation in ultrastructural morphology, and immunoexpression of VEGF and VEGFR-2 of rat masseter muscle.

Dias FJ, Issa JP, Barbosa AP, de Vasconcelos PB, Watanabe IS, Mizusakiiyomasa M

Department of Morphology, Stomatology and Physiology, Faculty of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida do Cafe, s/n, Monte Alegre, 14040-904 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.

The present study evaluates by ultrastructural and immunohistochemical methods, the possible changes on muscular tissue affected by LLLI during a treatment, for example, in cases of temporomandibular joint disorders. Sixty male Wistar rats divided into 6 groups (n=10) received ten laser irradiations, with different energy densities (groups I-0; II-0.5; III-1.0; IV-2.5; V-5.0; and VI-20J/cm(2)). Muscles were removed and processed for transmission electron microscopic and immunohistochemical (VEGF and VEGFR-2) analyses. Captured photomicrographs of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy were evaluated. It was observed in the irradiated muscles, mitochondria of different shapes and sizes, with increased plasticity evidenced by organelles in fusion, division and the presence of elongated structures with characteristics of mitochondria, proximity with the dilated sarcoplasmatic reticulum, suggesting organelles with large amounts of energy, and the presence of cytoplasmic protrusions in the capillaries with high dosages. All studied groups showed immunostainings for both markers (VEGF and VEGFR-2), but in general those who received higher doses also showed the markings more pronounced, suggesting dose-dependent biomodulation. It was concluded that the LLLI was able to modify the ultrastructural characteristics and immunohistochemical pattern of VEGF and VEGFR-2 in the masseter muscle of rats.

Micron 2011 Aug 30

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21924919

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The 800-nm diode laser irradiation induces skin collagen synthesis by stimulating TGF-beta/Smad signaling pathway.

Dang Y, Liu B, Liu L, Ye X, Bi X, Zhang Y, Gu J

School of Life Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062, China, dangyongyan@gmail.com.

The 800-nm diode laser is used clinically for hair removal and leg vein clearance. However, the effects of the laser on skin collagen synthesis have not been established. This study aims to research whether the 800-nm laser can be used for non-ablative rejuvenation and its possible mechanism by using an animal model. Eight 2-month-old rats were irradiated with the 800-nm diode laser at 20, 40, and 60 J/cm(2), respectively. Skin samples were taken for histological study and dermal thickness measurement at day 30 after laser irradiation. The expression of procollagen type I, III, IV, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), Smad2, 3, 4, and phosphorylated-Smad2, 3 in the rat skin was analyzed 24 h after completing all laser treatments by using RT-PCR and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the content of type I collagen in the skin at day 30 after laser irradiation. The 800-nm diode laser treatments markedly improved the histological structure and increased dermal thickness compared to the non-irradiated controls. Laser irradiation at 40 J/cm(2) significantly up-regulated the expression of procollagen type I and IV, TGF-beta and Smad2, 3, 4. The p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 levels were also enhanced in the laser-irradiated skin. The 800-nm laser is effective in improving skin structure and inducing skin new collagen expression. New collagen synthesis induced by the 800-nm laser was mediated by TGF-beta/Smad signaling pathway. Thus, it seemed that the 800-nm laser could be used for non-ablative rejuvenation in the future.

Lasers Med Sci 2011 Sep 4

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21892789

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Histopathological evaluation of the effect of intranasal phototherapy on nasal mucosa in rabbits.

Apuhan T, Terzi EH, Kukner A, Gok U

Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Izzet Baysal Medicine Faculty of Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey.

Allergic rhinitis is a high-incidence allergic inflammation of the nasal airways that impacts quality of life. Of the numerous therapies used to treat allergic rhinitis, intranasal phototherapy has emerged as a promising new treatment modality for inflammatory airway disease. Phototherapy is widely used for the treatment of immune-mediated skin diseases because its profound immunosuppressive effect inhibits hypersensitivity reactions in the skin. Intranasal phototherapy using a combination of Ultraviolet-A (UVA) and Ultraviolet-B (UVB) plus Visible light (VIS) has been shown to suppress the clinical symptoms of allergic rhinitis, but limited data regarding its adverse effects on the nasal mucosa currently exists. In this study, we demonstrate that UV displays no harmful effects on the nasal mucosa cells of rabbits following 2weeks of intranasal phototherapy.

J Photochem Photobiol B 2011 Oct 5 105(1) 94-7

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21890373

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[Treatment and prevention of cancer treatment related oral mucositis].

Ruiz-Esquide G, Nervi B, Vargas A, Maiz A

Departamento de Nutricion, Diabetes y Metabolismo, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de ChileSantiago, Chile.

One ofthe most common and troublesome complications ofmodern intensive anticancer treatments is oral mucositis. The purpose ofthis review is to summarize current evidente and clinical guidelines regarding its prevention and therapy. The use of keratinocyte growth factor-1, supplementary glutamine and other recently developed treatment modalities are discussed. The injury ofthe oral mucosa caused by antineoplastic agents promotes the local expression of multiple pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic molecules and eventually leads to the development of ulcers. Such lesions predispose patients to several infectious and nutritional complications. Also, they lead to modification of treatment schedules, potentially affecting overall prognosis. Local cryotherapy with ice chips and phototherapy with low energy laser may be useful as preventive measures. Mouthwashes with allopurinol and phototherapy with low energy laser can be used as treatment. In radiotherapy, special radiation administration techniques should be used to minimize mucosal injury. Pain control should always be optimized, with the use ofpatient controlled analgesia and topical use of morphine. Supplemental glutamine should not be used outside of research protocols. Lastly, thorough attention should bepaid to general care and hygiene measures.

Rev Med Chil 2011 Mar 139(3) 373-81

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=21879172

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About James Carroll

Founder and CEO at THOR Photomedicine Ltd. About THOR
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3 Responses to Low Level Laser Therapy LLLT / Cold Laser Literature watch for Sept 2011

  1. Valerie Lim says:

    My sister, 42 yrs old has just been diagnosed with Parkinson’s. Will LLLT therapy help her?
    I leave in Malaysia and where is the nearest centre where I can learn LLLT? Do I have to be
    a qualified nurse or doctor to use or learn the LLLT?

    Would appreciate a response from you.

    Thank you and have a good weekend.

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